Angebote zu "Uptown" (3 Treffer)

CHESS UPTOWN SOUL
22,49 € *
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CHESS UPTOWN SOUL: Various

Anbieter: Hugendubel.de
Stand: 19.07.2018
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Lula Reed - I´m Gone, Yes I´m Gone (LP)
17,95 € *
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(Sing) 16 tracks If obscurity were the hallmark of fame in R&B, Lula Reed would be a household name. As it is, she has become a puzzle - a true enigma in a field overun by sleuths and archaeologists. Lula Reed has managed to disappear without a trace quite a distinctive feat. But, as anyone who has heard her sing can attest, being distinctive is no stranger to Ms. Reed. What little is known of Lula Reed´s professional life follows the course of her association with pianist/bandleader Sonny Thompson. With Thompson´s assistance, Lula made about a dozen records for King in the early to mid-1950s. She moved from Syd Nathan´s King label to record briefly for the Chess brothers around 1957. One sample of her work (credited to Lulu Reed) appeared on the Chess blues anthology ´Walking By Myself´. Still later in the 1950s, Lula returned to King-Federal, recording both solo and in duet with Freddie King. Commercially speaking, nothing much came of any of it. Like a surprising number of R&B artists, Lula´s very first record enjoyed more success than just about any of her later work. ´I´ll Drown In My Tears´ made it to the number 5 position in Billboard´s R&B charts in 1952. ´Drown In My Own Tears´ has since become associated with Ray Charles, whose retitled version owed a debt to both Lula and pianist Sonny Thompson. The debt was repaid in the early 1960s, when Lula made an unexpected appearance on Charles´ own Tangerine label. As far as discographers are concerned, that was Lula´s last entry into the recor-ding archives. Sleuthwork continues and perhaps there will be good news to report in time for Volume 2 of this collection. But for the present, the lovely and memorable music on this album is our best evidence of Lula Reed´s life and very special talent. This album brings together some exceptionally fine music. Lula was fortunate to be associated with composers as talented as Titus Turner, Sonny Thompson, or A&R man Henry Glover. Whether such material was written by them or purchased from unknowns matters little at this point. What does matter is that many of the songs Lula recorded were standouts in a field that often unleashed throwaway material on its consumers. On ´Watchdog´, Lula turns in a strong reading of a surprisingly proto-feminist lyric. Her vocal is, as usual, anything but ordinary. Lula´s phrasing is individualistic and her tone has a delightful nasal, almost hillbilly quality. But Lula is no country singer. There is enough melisnia in her vocals to bring any self-respecting country church to its feet. Clarence Kenner´s acoustic guitar intru-des an almost country blues sound into an otherwise uptown R&B arrangement. Your Key Don´t Fit No More reveals some gentle sexual sym-bolism, although it is decidedly mild by R&B standards. Key is a standout track showing Lula´s affinity for deep blues with churchy chord changes. Within two years, Ray Charles would build a career on material like this. once again, Lula displays her gift for melisma ; she simply can not leave a ono syllable word alone. Her octave reach on the word ´changed´ is a joy to behold. Without Love recorded in November 1954, features some exceptional instrumental support. The alto/tenor sax voicings behing Lula´s vocal are reminiscent of the arrangements Maxwell Davis wrote for Percy Mayfield´s best records. Sonny Thompson´s piano work is worth special attention. His fills around Lula are quite daring for R&B. They owe a passing nod to jazzman ´Photo-nious Monk, whose avant garde piano style was hardly the stuff of R&B in 1954. Ironically, ´I´m Gone, Yes I´m Gone´, recorded at the same session, is the simplest song on the album. It has all the irrestable innocence of Fats Domino´s best work, much of which it predates. The track features an extended guitar solo and a bottom heavy backbeat that was node to propel( its way across a smoky juke-joint from the speakers of a vintage Wurlitzer. Finally, ´Three Men´ is an altogether excellent record, a catchy and clever song that deserved a bigger slice of the 1956 R&B sweepstakes. Lula´s vocal is distinguished as ever, but it has lost some of the youthful charm evident just three years earlier when she cut ´Going Back To Mexico´, the earliest track on this album. Lula Reed never earned the recognition accorded to her co-temporaries like Ruth Brown, LaVerne Baker or Dinah Washing-ton. Even singers like Faye Adams or Willie Mae Thornton, who enjoyed a single hit record, have become visible footnotes in the

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 17.07.2018
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Various - Sun Country Collection - Memphis Ramb...
24,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(1990/Rhino) At Sun Records on 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, wild rockabilly and polite country were part of the same continuum, as surely as Saturday nights rolled into Sunday mornings. In either category, genius producer Sam Phillips invariably sought out un-encumbered, passionate, plainly stated perform-ances. He wanted a mood to establish itself the second a song began and then intensify and ignite. Phillips´ Nashville contemporaries were adding scads of strings and busloads of back-up singers to sweeten songs for the uptown crowd, but Phillips sensed that frankness was gaining an edge over forced sophistication. Phillips arrived at this method partly by ingenuity and partly by necessity—after all, fewer musicians on a session meant fewer people to pay. But from the start, Phillips was also searching for something novel. Phillips, an Alabaman, moved to Memphis in 1944 for a disk jockey spot at WREC. In 1949 and 1950, he put together a makeshift recording studio in what was previously a Union Avenue radiator shop. In his first step toward greatness, Phillips began record-ing local performers and leasing the witty, angular sides to labels like Chess and Modern. By the end of 1951, thanks to the success of Jackie Brenston´s rock ´n´ roll forerunner ´Rocket 887 Phillips was able to quit WREC and concentrate on building his own label, Sun Records. With vital blues and R&B performers like Rufus Thomas, Howlin´ Wolf, and Junior Parker in his stable, Phillips over-saw the finest electric blues from outside Chicago being made at the time. Phillips´ breakthrough approach, unquenched emotion drenched in echo, resulted in a tidal wave of raw, early recordings that still startle. Yet Phillips´ ambitions ranged beyond what he heard in the blues, and the natural next step for him was to find the points of intersection between the blues and country and western. Many of the lasting performers on Sun Country Volume One are singer/guitarists without full-blown bands. Most of the recordings are based around voice and acoustic six-string, and in some cases that´s the whole arrangement: Howard Seratt´s ´Make Room In The Lifeboat For Me,´ country gospel worthy of the dread-drenched Louvin Brothers, features only the haunted singer´s guitar and harmonica. Even on uptempo tunes, Phillips saw to it that drums were used sparingly, the idea was to flip convention and let the song drive the band. Because there were fewer players to shift around, Phillips and his flock could experiment with different treatments of the same tune. Radically dissimilar takes of Warren Smith´s ´So Long I´m Gone´ serve as bookends to Sun Country Volume One and go a long way toward telling the grand story of how country spawned rockabilly. The words are the same in both Charlie Feathers but the attitudes couldn´t be farther apart. Smith is best known as a post-Presley rocker (his raucous calling cards are ´Rock And Roll Ruby´ and the tasteless ´Ubangi Stomp´), but the country take of ´So Long I´m Gone´ that kicks off this set fore-shadows his move into straight C&W after he left Sun. On this slow version, Smith collapses into regret, missing the occasional guitar strum, mortified that he has to leave his philandering lover. The fast rockabilly variation that slams this record shut is triumphant, the sound of a hardened man deter-mined to beat adversity. He´s out the door, he´s bound for glory. The fast ´So Long I´m Gone´ sounds like freedom. Throughout Sun Country Volume One are land-marks of Sam Phillips´ move from invigorating standard country forms to exploring a new type of country he helped invent. A key part of the journey takes place during ´My Rind Of Carryin´ On:´ recorded by future insurance salesman Doug Poindexter and the Starlite Wranglers. The Wranglers were legend-ary Elvis accomplices Scotty Moore on guitar and Bill Black on bass, the duo had already begun rehearsing with Presley when this was recorded in May 1954. Poindexter isn´t much of a singer (his delivery makes it seem as if he was unaware of the lyrics´ risque innuendoes), but we can hear the seeds of Moore´s imminent breakthrough with Presley in his brief solo bursts. It´s history, to be sure, but it´s also ferocious in its own right. Sun Country Volume One is full of these magical moments, none of which have appeared on any previous Rhino collection. (Completists may wish to discover Bear Family´s massive The Sun Country Years 11-LP box set, which tells the whole story.) Sun´s big names are

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 17.07.2018
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